More on the wolf situation…

Effective immediately, wolves in Minnesota can only be killed in defense of human life.

Only agents of the government are authorized to take wolves if pets or livestock are threatened, attacked or killed.

Protect all evidence and report depredation incidents to a DNR conservation officer. Use the Conservation Officer Locator and leave a recorded message 24/7.

A federal judge’s decision to immediately reinstate Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan place the animals under protection of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Wolves now revert to the federal protection status they had prior to being removed from the endangered species list in the Great Lakes region in January 2012. That means wolves now are federally classified as threatened in Minnesota and endangered elsewhere in the Great Lakes region.

More information will become available on the DNR wolf management page. You also can join the Facebook discussion.

Wolves reclassified as endangered.

ling classifies Minnesota wolves as threatened

Effective immediately, Minnesotans can no longer legally kill a wolf except in the defense of human life.

A federal judge’s decision to immediately reinstate Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan place the animals under protection of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Wolves now revert to the federal protection status they had prior to being removed from the endangered species list in the Great Lakes region in January 2012. That means wolves now are federally classified as threatened in Minnesota and endangered elsewhere in the Great Lakes region.

Only agents of the government are authorized to take wolves if depredation occurs.

New Treatment for Zebra Mussels on Christmas Lake

Mery-Christmas-TO-MeFrom the DNR:

New treatment aims to eradicate Christmas Lake zebra mussels

In an effort to eliminate any remaining zebra mussels from Christmas Lake in Shorewood, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has undertaken an experimental treatment that has been used only twice before in the U.S.

On Friday, Dec. 19, a contractor working with the DNR injected 1,000 pounds of potassium chloride under the ice near the public boat access on the northwest corner of Christmas Lake. The chemical – also referred to as potash – kills zebra mussels by interfering with their ability to breathe, but it does not affect fish.

The potash application is the third treatment at the lake, where a small number of zebra mussels were found in August as part of the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District’s early detection monitoring program. Because the mussels were found early and were confined to a small area, DNR staff thought it feasible that treatment might eliminate them. The DNR and the district have subsequently treated the affected portion of the lake with Zequanox, a substance made up of dead bacteria, and later with a copper-based chemical.

“We’re trying all available options at Christmas Lake as the zebra mussel infestation was isolated to a small area of the lake,” said Keegan Lund, an invasive species specialist for the DNR. “Most importantly, we’re learning a lot about new treatment methods for zebra mussels that have not been used before in lakes.”

This treatment is only the third time that potash has been used for zebra mussel control in the United States. Because the chemical is not a federally registered pesticide, the DNR first needed to obtain authorization from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under an emergency exemption. Potash then needed to be registered as a pesticide with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency also reviewed the potash treatment plan and did not find immediate water quality concerns with the proposal.

If successful, the efforts at Christmas Lake could become the first time zebra mussels have been eradicated from a Minnesota water body, providing valuable information on treatment options when the invasive pests are discovered early.

A potash treatment may also be tried next spring on Lake Independence, where zebra mussels were found in October at the Baker Park Reserve boat launch. Both lakes will continue to be monitored to determine if the treatment s were successful.

Zebra mussels are an invasive species that can crowd out native mussels and compete for food sources with other aquatic animals such as larval fish. They attach to boat hulls and other water-related equipment and can create a hazard for swimmers due to their sharp shells.

 

DAKOTA REPORT: North Dakota Makes Decision on 2015 Deer Licensing

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FROM ND GAME AND FISH:

Game and Fish to Maintain Current Deer License System

The State Game and Fish Department has decided to not implement its proposal to limit deer hunters to only one license for the 2015 season.

While it is still months before the 2015 season is set, that means deer hunters will again be able to apply for deer gun and muzzleloader lottery licenses, and also purchase an archery license.

Game and Fish Director Terry Steinwand said the decision involved several factors, including substantial public input both for and against the proposal, and significant costs needed to put the new system in place.

“One of our goals is to increase the deer population statewide, and we can still work toward that under the current system,” Steinwand said.

Under the proposal that Game and Fish offered in early November, in 2015 deer hunters who received a lottery deer gun or muzzleloader license, or a gratis license, would not have been able to purchase an additional archery license.

Game and Fish drafted the proposal based on public input and comments following eight special deer meetings held in February 2014. The meetings were set up to encourage public input on options for changing the way deer licenses are distributed, because of a significant reduction in the state’s deer population.

In 2014 Game and Fish allocated 48,000 deer gun season licenses, compared to more than 140,000 licenses as recently as 2008.

In addition, Game and Fish used the recent fall round of district advisory board meetings to further discuss the resulting proposal. “Over the past year,” Steinwand said, “we’ve had a thorough and healthy discussion on the Department’s role in providing opportunity.”

For instance, in 2013 about 10,000 hunters had both gun and bow licenses, while just over 20,000 prospective hunters who applied for a gun license did not receive any type of deer license.

“This was a social issue more than it was a biological issue,” Steinwand said, “but it is Game and Fish’s responsibility to address how our policies and regulations affect hunters as well as wildlife. We will continue to look at all feasible alternatives for future years that will provide opportunity for the most hunters possible.”

Minnesota Deer Hunters Association Hires New Director

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From MDHA: 

Craig Engwall

Craig Engwall

The Minnesota Deer Hunters Association (MDHA) is proud to announce Craig Engwall as their new Executive Director.  Engwall will be responsible for the leadership and management of MDHA in accordance to the strategic plan, Corporate Bylaws and MDHA’s mission of “working for tomorrow’s wildlife and hunter’s today.”

Craig joins MDHA to further pursue his passion for the outdoors and use his 20+ years experience in law, natural resources, and conservation to serve the members and the deer herd.  “I have always greatly admired the work that the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association has done on behalf of Minnesota deer hunters, so to now become a part of the MDHA team and contribute to those efforts is truly exciting.” Engwall resides in Dora Lake, MN at a family deer camp that is over 50 years old. He also has roots that run deep in Minnesota with family ties to both Duluth and Winthrop.

Graduating from Gustavus Adolphus College in 1986 and the University of Minnesota Law School in 1991, Engwall has pursued his passion for the outdoors in both his personal and professional life by working on natural resources and agriculture issues at both the state and federal levels, including facilitating the linkage between the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program and the Federal Conservation Reserve (CRP) and Wetlands Reserve Programs (WRP).  Craig also was a key player in Minnesota acquiring the largest conservation easement in state history – the nearly 200,000 acre Blandin Paper Company project that protects forest lands from parcelization while providing key habitat and public access to those lands.  As a lifelong deer hunter, Engwall can’t wait to put his personal interests and professional experiences to work on behalf of Minnesota’s deer habitat and deer hunters.

MDHA Interim Executive Director, Denis Quarberg, states “Craig will fill a crucial role within the organization and we fully anticipate his presence will ensure MDHA will not only succeed but grow for many years to come. The MDHA Executive Board and Staff welcome Craig.”

Craig will join the MDHA staff full-time starting January 2, 2015.To contact Craig, please call 218-244-6822 or email craig.e@mndeerhunters.com.

MNSJ RADIO PODCAST: Jeff Gustafson from “Fishing with Gussy”

Ballards-Resort-Ad---webJeff Gustafson from the “Fishing with Gussy” tv show was down in the Twin Cities for the ice show and took a few minutes to talk to us about fishing on Lake of the Woods, hunting wolves, hunting moose and fishing the FLW.

Listen to Jeff here.